Biodiversity loss accelerates with 1 million species at risk of extinction, UN report finds

PBS - May 6, 2019

People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.

But it’s not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations’ first comprehensive report on biodiversity.

“We have reconfigured dramatically life on the planet,” report co-chairman Eduardo Brondizio of Indiana University said at a press conference.

Species loss is accelerating to a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, the report said. More than half a million species on land “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored. The oceans are not any better off…

Plan has new rules on killing wolves that prey on livestock

Associated Press Monday, April 15th 2019

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — With Oregon's wolf population growing, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on Monday issued a draft conservation and management plan that established a new timetable involving when wolves can be killed for preying on livestock.

The old plan allowed for hunts after two confirmed wolf depredations of livestock in an area. The new plan would allow hunts only after two confirmed depredations within a nine-month period, said Derek Broman, state carnivore biologist.

The new plan also includes a hefty section on how to attempt to resolve conflicts involving livestock without killing wolves, which environmental groups prefer, Broman said.

The goal of the 160-page proposal remains the same as previous plans issued in 2005 and 2010: "To ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by...

Wolves ‘Established’ in Netherlands for First Time in 140 Years

Olivia Rosane Apr. 10, 2019

For the first time in 140 years, wolves have an official home in the Netherlands.

Ecologists told BBC Radio 4 that a female wolf they had been tracking had stayed in the country for six months and could therefore be called "established," BBC News reported Tuesday.

 

The ecologists had been tracking two females in the Hoge Veluwe nature reserve, which has now been designated as a wolf habitat, Dutch News reported. There is also evidence that a male wolf has been moving in and out of the area, and scientists told BBC that the wolves could form a pack within...

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Biodiversity loss accelerates with 1 million species at risk of extinction, UN report finds

PBS - May 6, 2019

People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.

But it’s not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations’ first comprehensive report on biodiversity.

“We have reconfigured dramatically life on the planet,” report co-chairman Eduardo Brondizio of Indiana University said at a press conference.

Species loss is accelerating to a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, the report said. More than half a million species on land “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored. The oceans are not any better off…

Plan has new rules on killing wolves that prey on livestock

Associated Press Monday, April 15th 2019

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — With Oregon's wolf population growing, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on Monday issued a draft conservation and management plan that established a new timetable involving when wolves can be killed for preying on livestock.

The old plan allowed for hunts after two confirmed wolf depredations of livestock in an area. The new plan would allow hunts only after two confirmed depredations within a nine-month period, said Derek Broman, state carnivore biologist.

The new plan also includes a hefty section on how to attempt to resolve conflicts involving livestock without killing wolves, which environmental groups prefer, Broman said.

The goal of the 160-page proposal remains the same as previous plans issued in 2005 and 2010: "To ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by...

Wolves ‘Established’ in Netherlands for First Time in 140 Years

Olivia Rosane Apr. 10, 2019

For the first time in 140 years, wolves have an official home in the Netherlands.

Ecologists told BBC Radio 4 that a female wolf they had been tracking had stayed in the country for six months and could therefore be called "established," BBC News reported Tuesday.

 

The ecologists had been tracking two females in the Hoge Veluwe nature reserve, which has now been designated as a wolf habitat, Dutch News reported. There is also evidence that a male wolf has been moving in and out of the area, and scientists told BBC that the wolves could form a pack within...

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Welcome to Forest Web of Cottage Grove…

Forests precede civilizations and deserts follow them...  This simple quotation lives at the heart of Forest Web.  If we want to change this sad truth, we need to change the concepts of how we relate to the natural world on which all of us depend.

 

Root systems may occupy an area four to seven times the surface area

occupied by the crown of the tree.  Not only do these roots provide

nutrients to the tree and prevent soil erosion, they also play host to a

variety of fungi, or Mycorrhizae, forming a symbiotic relationship.

These fungi receive sustenance from the tree and, in turn, increase

the efficiency of the tree’s root system, creating a web throughout a

healthy forest.

 

Forest Web of Cottage Grove applies this lesson from Nature to our

organization, working with a variety of environmental groups,

co-hosting events and hikes, collaborating on lobbying efforts and

comment campaigns, and sharing information and support to nurture

all our common goals.

 

And, to continue building this network, we operate an ever-growing email list, a Facebook page, Youtube Channel, and this website to activate, educate and inform.  To receive updates, action alerts, and event notices, please contact us at forestweb.cg@gmail.com.

Forest Web of Cottage Grove

Join us for a 2-Day Climate Series Event!

For the second installment in our series of climate-related events, we invite you to join us for two events over two days.   On Friday evening, a free screening of the multi award-winning documentary “A Plastic Ocean,” followed by a presentation by David Gardiepy, and a plastics collection event with EcoGeneration on Saturday.

 

Day 1 - “A Plastic Ocean: We Need a Wave of Change”

with guest speaker:  David Gardiepy, Founder of EcoGeneration

 

When:  Friday, November 8th, from 7:00pm to 9:00pm

Where:  Cottage Grove Community Center, 700 E Gibbs Ave., Cottage Grove

 

Released   in 2016 by explorers Craig Leeson and Tanya Streeter and a team of international scientists, this documentary demonstrates the staggering scope of the environmental disaster affecting all the oceans of the planet.  The team travelled to 20 locations around the world over four years to explore the fragile state of our oceans and discover alarming truths about plastic pollution and reveal working solutions that can be applied now.

After the film, David Gardiepy will give a presentation on recycling, both plastics and curbside, as well as discussing how waste driven by over-consumerism, is impacting the planet and ways to reduce our carbon footprint.

About Our Speaker…

Featured in a recent edition of The Cottage Grove Sentinel, David Gardiepy founded the local nonprofit, EcoGeneration, to develop collection solutions for plastics in our community.  He hosts recycling efforts, addressing the serious need for plastic recycling options in Lane County.

 

“Local recycling program unique to county”

 

This event is hosted by Climate Action CG, EcoGeneration, Forest Web, and Sustainable Cottage Grove

 

Day 2 – EcoGeneration's Recycling Take Back in Cottage Grove

When:  Saturday, November 9th, from 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Where:  Cottage Grove Armory, 628 E Washington Ave., Cottage Grove

 

EcoGeneration will be collecting #2, 4, and 5 plastics that are clean and label-free on Saturday from 1:00pm to 4:00pm at the Cottage Grove Armory.  Bring your recyclable plastics or simply drop by to learn more about EcoGeneration’s collection program or to get involved as a volunteer.

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17 States Sue to Stop Trump Admin Attack on Endangered Species Act

By Olivia Rosane Sep. 26, 2019 07:07AM EST

A little more than a month after the Trump administration announced a major rollback of the Endangered Species Act, 17 states are suing to stop it.

 

The administration's changes would remove the blanket rule giving threatened species the same protections as endangered species, allow regulators to calculate the economic cost of protecting any given species and make it harder to protect species from the impacts of the climate crisis.

Taxpayers prop up the biggest carbon culprit in Oregon: timber

by Emily Green | 18 Oct 2019

Oregonians lose hundreds of millions of tax dollars a year subsidizing the forest industry. Enough, says John Talberth, of the Center for Sustainable Economy.

 

The Center for Sustainable Economy is calling attention to how taxpayers subsidize one of the greatest contributors to climate change in Oregon – to the tune of at least $750 million per year, according to its analysis.

The Portland-based think tank has determined big timber is topping the list of carbon emitters in the state, finding that industrial logging is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. Last year, researchers at Oregon State University and University of Idaho corroborated those findings.

While state officials have largely ignored these studies, the Oregon Global Warming Commission has been working with the Oregon Department of Forestry on a Forest Carbon Accounting Project aimed at calculating the net emission of carbon from logging once factors such as carbon stores in wood products are taken into account. Their final report is expected in June.

Internationally, nations including the U.S. have agreed to phase out environmentally harmful subsidies. This should include subsidies and tax breaks going to Oregon’s multibillion-dollar timber industry, which is emitting more carbon dioxide than the state’s transportation sector, argues John Talberth, senior economist at the Center for Sustainable Economy – especially considering the sale of Oregon timber is increasingly benefiting foreign investors.

Wolf post-recovery planning: Public input

WDFW is inviting the public to comment on the scope of a post-recovery plan for wolves in Washington. We will use the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) process to develop the plan. This involves preparing a draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that will be available for public review. That document will evaluate actions, alternatives, and impacts related to long-term wolf conservation and management.

 

The first step of the SEPA process involves scoping, which helps us determine proposed actions, alternatives, and impacts to be discussed in the impact statement. Scoping improves decisions and encourages collaboration, cooperation, and early resolution of potential conflicts. It is intended to narrow the impact statement to the relevant issues.

 

Scoping is a public process and we encourage everyone to provide input.

The public scoping comment period for this process is open from August 1, 2019 through November 1, 2019.  Three live, interactive webinars were part of this process and recordings of each are below. They included a presentation, opportunity to ask questions, and information on how to submit comments. 

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