Biodiversity loss accelerates with 1 million species at risk of extinction, UN report finds

PBS - May 6, 2019

People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.

But it’s not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations’ first comprehensive report on biodiversity.

“We have reconfigured dramatically life on the planet,” report co-chairman Eduardo Brondizio of Indiana University said at a press conference.

Species loss is accelerating to a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, the report said. More than half a million species on land “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored. The oceans are not any better off…

Plan has new rules on killing wolves that prey on livestock

Associated Press Monday, April 15th 2019

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — With Oregon's wolf population growing, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on Monday issued a draft conservation and management plan that established a new timetable involving when wolves can be killed for preying on livestock.

The old plan allowed for hunts after two confirmed wolf depredations of livestock in an area. The new plan would allow hunts only after two confirmed depredations within a nine-month period, said Derek Broman, state carnivore biologist.

The new plan also includes a hefty section on how to attempt to resolve conflicts involving livestock without killing wolves, which environmental groups prefer, Broman said.

The goal of the 160-page proposal remains the same as previous plans issued in 2005 and 2010: "To ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by...

Wolves ‘Established’ in Netherlands for First Time in 140 Years

Olivia Rosane Apr. 10, 2019

For the first time in 140 years, wolves have an official home in the Netherlands.

Ecologists told BBC Radio 4 that a female wolf they had been tracking had stayed in the country for six months and could therefore be called "established," BBC News reported Tuesday.

 

The ecologists had been tracking two females in the Hoge Veluwe nature reserve, which has now been designated as a wolf habitat, Dutch News reported. There is also evidence that a male wolf has been moving in and out of the area, and scientists told BBC that the wolves could form a pack within...

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Biodiversity loss accelerates with 1 million species at risk of extinction, UN report finds

PBS - May 6, 2019

People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.

But it’s not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations’ first comprehensive report on biodiversity.

“We have reconfigured dramatically life on the planet,” report co-chairman Eduardo Brondizio of Indiana University said at a press conference.

Species loss is accelerating to a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, the report said. More than half a million species on land “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored. The oceans are not any better off…

Plan has new rules on killing wolves that prey on livestock

Associated Press Monday, April 15th 2019

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — With Oregon's wolf population growing, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on Monday issued a draft conservation and management plan that established a new timetable involving when wolves can be killed for preying on livestock.

The old plan allowed for hunts after two confirmed wolf depredations of livestock in an area. The new plan would allow hunts only after two confirmed depredations within a nine-month period, said Derek Broman, state carnivore biologist.

The new plan also includes a hefty section on how to attempt to resolve conflicts involving livestock without killing wolves, which environmental groups prefer, Broman said.

The goal of the 160-page proposal remains the same as previous plans issued in 2005 and 2010: "To ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by...

Wolves ‘Established’ in Netherlands for First Time in 140 Years

Olivia Rosane Apr. 10, 2019

For the first time in 140 years, wolves have an official home in the Netherlands.

Ecologists told BBC Radio 4 that a female wolf they had been tracking had stayed in the country for six months and could therefore be called "established," BBC News reported Tuesday.

 

The ecologists had been tracking two females in the Hoge Veluwe nature reserve, which has now been designated as a wolf habitat, Dutch News reported. There is also evidence that a male wolf has been moving in and out of the area, and scientists told BBC that the wolves could form a pack within...

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Welcome to Forest Web of Cottage Grove…

Forests precede civilizations and deserts follow them...  This simple quotation lives at the heart of Forest Web.  If we want to change this sad truth, we need to change the concepts of how we relate to the natural world on which all of us depend.

 

Root systems may occupy an area four to seven times the surface area

occupied by the crown of the tree.  Not only do these roots provide

nutrients to the tree and prevent soil erosion, they also play host to a

variety of fungi, or Mycorrhizae, forming a symbiotic relationship.

These fungi receive sustenance from the tree and, in turn, increase

the efficiency of the tree’s root system, creating a web throughout a

healthy forest.

 

Forest Web of Cottage Grove applies this lesson from Nature to our

organization, working with a variety of environmental groups,

co-hosting events and hikes, collaborating on lobbying efforts and

comment campaigns, and sharing information and support to nurture

all our common goals.

 

And, to continue building this network, we operate an ever-growing email list, a Facebook page, Youtube Channel, and this website to activate, educate and inform.  To receive updates, action alerts, and event notices, please contact us at forestweb.cg@gmail.com.

Forest Web of Cottage Grove

Free Screening of The 11th Hour

Turn Mankind’s Darkest Hour into its Finest

When:  Friday, January 24th at 7:00pm
Where: The Rural Organizing Project Building, 632 E. Main Street, Cottage Grove, Oregon

For the fourth installment in our series of climate-related events, we invite you to join us for a free screening of the The 11th Hour, followed by a discussion of the film.

About The 11th Hour...

With contributions from over 50 politicians, scientists, and environmental activists, including former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, physicist Stephen Hawking, Nobel Prize winner Wangari Maathai, journalist Armand Betscher, and Paul Hawken, the film documents the grave problems facing the planet's life systems. Global warming, deforestation, mass species extinction, and depletion of the oceans' habitats are all addressed. The film's premise is that the future of humanity is in jeopardy.

The film proposes potential solutions to these problems by calling for restorative action by the reshaping and rethinking of global human activity through technology, social responsibility and conservation.

The 11th Hour asks why these things are happening and apportions blame in varying degrees to governmental indifference tied to its allegiance to a corporate economy that is addicted to growth at any cost and perhaps, most insinuating of all, to the culture of consumerism. Disposable has trumped sustainable in our society, and we're now paying the price. Thankfully for audiences, the film is not without hope. The filmmakers save the most exhilarating portion for last when they ask what's being done about the problems. Experts extol existing technologies and projects as attainable solutions. Progressive designs such as a carbon-neutral city and self-sustaining buildings already offer ideas for a new direction. By mimicking nature's own blueprints, it is possible to create a system of living that heals rather than depletes the Earth.

Hosted by:  Climate Action Cottage Grove; Forest Web; Sustainable Cottage Grove

This event is free and open to the public

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Group raises nearly $16 million to buy Alder Creek giant sequoia grove

By Bettina BoxallStaff Writer Jan. 8, 2020

The donations ranged from $1 to several million. The money came from across the country and around the world.

Save the Redwoods League raised nearly $16 million — more than half of it in four months — to close a deal for 530 acres of the Alder Creek Grove of giant sequoias.

The century-old conservation group took title to the Sierra Nevada property on Dec. 30, realizing a long-held dream of acquiring the world’s largest private holding of the world’s largest trees.

League officials said the $15.65 million from individuals and foundations is the most the organization has ever raised in purely private donations for a single conservation project.

“It was incredible,” said Becky Bremser, the league’s director of land protection. “We are so thrilled. And...

The real cause of division in communities

Guest View By David Eisler Register Guard – January 7, 2020

Amanda Astor ends her recent column with “Better understanding of forests and the science behind decision making can bring our community closer and tear down divisions and alarmist narratives.”

Apparently she believes that scientists’ and community members’ concerns about the impacts of industrial logging are alarmist and have no basis in fact. Astor would have us all simply accept timber companies public relations and we should all get along just fine living with high-impact clearcutting, aerial herbicide spraying, monocrop plantations and the decimation of forest and aquatic ecosystems.

So, let’s be clear about what seems to be the cause of division in the communities…

Pacific Northwest forests fit trifecta for curbing climate change — if we stop logging them

by Cassandra Profita Oregon Public Broadcasting / January 1, 2020

Study shows trees along the coast and in the Cascade and Olympic mountains have the most potential to sequester carbon.
new study finds some Northwest forests have a lot of potential to capture carbon and offset climate change. That is, if they’re preserved and not logged.

Researchers at Oregon State University and the University of California, Berkeley, looked at which forests in the Western United States should be prioritized for preservation under climate change scenarios.

They analyzed which forests have the most potential to sequester carbon, are least vulnerable to drought and fire, and also provide valuable habitat for endangered species.

Many of the forests that hit that trifecta are along the Oregon and Washington coast and in the Cascade and Olympic mountains.

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