Biodiversity loss accelerates with 1 million species at risk of extinction, UN report finds

PBS - May 6, 2019

People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.

But it’s not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations’ first comprehensive report on biodiversity.

“We have reconfigured dramatically life on the planet,” report co-chairman Eduardo Brondizio of Indiana University said at a press conference.

Species loss is accelerating to a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, the report said. More than half a million species on land “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored. The oceans are not any better off…

Plan has new rules on killing wolves that prey on livestock

Associated Press Monday, April 15th 2019

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — With Oregon's wolf population growing, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on Monday issued a draft conservation and management plan that established a new timetable involving when wolves can be killed for preying on livestock.

The old plan allowed for hunts after two confirmed wolf depredations of livestock in an area. The new plan would allow hunts only after two confirmed depredations within a nine-month period, said Derek Broman, state carnivore biologist.

The new plan also includes a hefty section on how to attempt to resolve conflicts involving livestock without killing wolves, which environmental groups prefer, Broman said.

The goal of the 160-page proposal remains the same as previous plans issued in 2005 and 2010: "To ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by...

Wolves ‘Established’ in Netherlands for First Time in 140 Years

Olivia Rosane Apr. 10, 2019

For the first time in 140 years, wolves have an official home in the Netherlands.

Ecologists told BBC Radio 4 that a female wolf they had been tracking had stayed in the country for six months and could therefore be called "established," BBC News reported Tuesday.

 

The ecologists had been tracking two females in the Hoge Veluwe nature reserve, which has now been designated as a wolf habitat, Dutch News reported. There is also evidence that a male wolf has been moving in and out of the area, and scientists told BBC that the wolves could form a pack within...

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Biodiversity loss accelerates with 1 million species at risk of extinction, UN report finds

PBS - May 6, 2019

People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.

But it’s not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations’ first comprehensive report on biodiversity.

“We have reconfigured dramatically life on the planet,” report co-chairman Eduardo Brondizio of Indiana University said at a press conference.

Species loss is accelerating to a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, the report said. More than half a million species on land “have insufficient habitat for long-term survival” and are likely to go extinct, many within decades, unless their habitats are restored. The oceans are not any better off…

Plan has new rules on killing wolves that prey on livestock

Associated Press Monday, April 15th 2019

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — With Oregon's wolf population growing, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife on Monday issued a draft conservation and management plan that established a new timetable involving when wolves can be killed for preying on livestock.

The old plan allowed for hunts after two confirmed wolf depredations of livestock in an area. The new plan would allow hunts only after two confirmed depredations within a nine-month period, said Derek Broman, state carnivore biologist.

The new plan also includes a hefty section on how to attempt to resolve conflicts involving livestock without killing wolves, which environmental groups prefer, Broman said.

The goal of the 160-page proposal remains the same as previous plans issued in 2005 and 2010: "To ensure the conservation of gray wolves as required by...

Wolves ‘Established’ in Netherlands for First Time in 140 Years

Olivia Rosane Apr. 10, 2019

For the first time in 140 years, wolves have an official home in the Netherlands.

Ecologists told BBC Radio 4 that a female wolf they had been tracking had stayed in the country for six months and could therefore be called "established," BBC News reported Tuesday.

 

The ecologists had been tracking two females in the Hoge Veluwe nature reserve, which has now been designated as a wolf habitat, Dutch News reported. There is also evidence that a male wolf has been moving in and out of the area, and scientists told BBC that the wolves could form a pack within...

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Welcome to Forest Web…

Forests precede civilizations and deserts follow them...  This simple quotation lives at the heart of Forest Web.  If we want to change this sad truth, we need to change the concepts of how we relate to the natural world on which all of us depend.

 

Root systems may occupy an area four to seven times the surface area

occupied by the crown of the tree.  Not only do these roots provide

nutrients to the tree and prevent soil erosion, they also play host to a

variety of fungi, or Mycorrhizae, forming a symbiotic relationship.

These fungi receive sustenance from the tree and, in turn, increase

the efficiency of the tree’s root system, creating a web throughout a

healthy forest.

 

Forest Web of Cottage Grove applies this lesson from Nature to our

organization, working with a variety of environmental groups,

co-hosting events and hikes, collaborating on lobbying efforts and

comment campaigns, and sharing information and support to nurture

all our common goals.

 

And, to continue building this network, we operate an ever-growing email list, a Facebook page, Youtube Channel, and this website to activate, educate and inform.  To receive updates, action alerts, and event notices, please contact us at forestweb.cg@gmail.com.

Forest Web of Cottage Grove

Over 200 Top U.S. Climate and Forest Scientists Urge Congress: Protect Forests to Mitigate Climate Crisis

May 13, 2020

As multiple current legislative proposals attempt to shoehorn measures that would increase logging, or increase funding for logging, into COVID-19 stimulus packages, over 200 top U.S. climate and forest scientists are now asking Congressional leaders to avoid using the pandemic emergency as a means for stripping away forest protections and promoting logging. In a historic and unprecedented letter sent to Congress today, the scientists conclude that, in order to avoid the worst impacts of the climate crisis, moving beyond fossil fuel consumption is not enough, and we must also increase forest protections and shift away from energy-intensive and greenhouse-gas polluting wood consumption….

Why your immune system needs a forest

Natural Intelligence 5-13-20

Even though we have reduced most of the forests of the world to charcoal, toilet paper, building material and dust, the remaining forests still offer us an incredible immune boost. Nearly 1,000 scientific studies “point in one direction: Nature is not only nice to have, but it’s a have-to-have for physical health and cognitive function,” according to the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

 

For instance, studies with students and elderly show that spending time in nature significantly reduces inflammation. Additionally, research from the Nippon Medical School in Japan shows that time spent in forests increases the number of natural killer cells, which promote our immune defense, while expanding the functional activity of these antiviral cells. What is more, the research also showed that forest visits increase the amount of intracellular anticancer proteins and this effect lasted for a full week after the trip. None of these effects were observed after city trips.

Conservation groups ask Washington state to kill fewer wolves

By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS, Associated Press Published: May 11, 2020, 12:08pm

SPOKANE — Conservation groups on Monday asked the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission to sharply limit the number of endangered wolves that are killed over conflicts with livestock.

The state has killed 31 wolves since 2012, under a system that environmental groups contend favors ranchers over the animals.

“”Washington’s trigger-happy wolf program favors livestock owners and ignores sound science,” said Sophia Ressler, an attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “It’s a broken system.””

Officials for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The conservation groups want the wildlife commission to amend its rules to require that livestock producers use appropriate non-lethal deterrence methods to prevent conflict between livestock and wolves. The new rules would ensure that...

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